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6684 feet

Saturday I hiked with the Schlesinger brothers to the highest point east of the Mississippi River. Check out one of my pics from 6684 feet atop Mt. Mitchell.mt.mitchell blog

Some things I pondered…

  • Experienced hikers are fun to be around (thanks Garrett)
  • Long hikes with higher altitudes require thoughtful preparation (food, hydration, clothing)
  • Nauseating obstacles are there to be overcome
  • Leading required thinking about others (pace, staying on the trail, rest)
  • Followers have the pleasure of watching how the leader climbs the trail (roots, rocks, branches)
  • Ascending the steep terrain was demanding on my mind, heart, and lungs. This made it challenging to enjoy the landscape.
  • Difficult hikes require some breaks in order to restore energy supplies
  • How does a person who hiked up 3500′ feet  for three hours appreciate the summit view any more than the person who rode a motorcycle, car, or bus to the summit?
  • Balance was needed ascending and descending (roots, rocks, branches, trees)
  • Some spots are always slippery.
  • While descending was more demanding on my leg muscles and joints, my mind, lungs, and heart got a break. The landscape was much easier to enjoy.
  • Aches and pains today remind me of the enjoyable hike with spectacular views
  • Very anxious to hike another mountain
  • Calvin’s Distinctives Part 3

    The Expository Genius of John CalvinSteve Lawson considers distinctions of Calvin that make him so influential in the book The Expository Genius of John Calvin. Over the next couple of days I want to record Lawson’s distinctions.

    Crafting the Delivery

    1. Familiar Words
    2. Vivid Expressions
    3. Provocative Questions
    4. Simple Restatements
    5. Limited Quotations
    6. Unspoken Outline
    7. Seamless Transitions
    8. Focused Intensity

    Applying the Truth

    1. Pastoral Exhortation
    2. Personal Examination
    3. Loving Rebuke
    4. Polemic Confrontation

    Concluding the Exposition

    1. Succinct Summation
    2. Pressing Appeal
    3. Climatic Prayer

    Calvin’s Distinctives Part 2

    The Expository Genius of John CalvinSteve Lawson considers distinctions of Calvin that make him so influential in his book The Expository Genius of John Calvin. Over the next couple of days I want to record Lawson’s distinctions.

    Launching the Sermon

    1. Direct Beginning
    2. Extemporaneous Delivery
    3. Scriptural Context
    4. State Theme

    Expounding the Text

    1. Specific Text
    2. Exegetical Precision
    3. Literal Interpretation
    4. Cross-References
    5. Persuasive Reasoning
    6. Reasonable Deductions

    John Calvin’s Last Will

    john-calvinSteven Lawson shares Calvin’s last will and testament in his small book The Expository Genius of John Calvin. Calvin’s will was dictated to Theodore Beza April 25, 1564:

    “In the name of God, I, John Calvin, servant of the Word of God in the church of Geneva, …thank God that He has shown not only mercy toward me, His poor creature, and…has suffered me in all sins and weaknesses, but what is much more, that He has made me a partaker of His grace to serve Him through my work…I confess to live and die in this faith which He has given me, inasmuch as I have no other hope or refuge than His predestination upon which my entire salvation is grounded. I embrace the grace which He has offered me in our Lord Jesus Christ and accept the merits of His suffering and dying, that through them all my sins are buried; and I humbly beg Him to wash me and cleanse me with the blood of our great Redeemer,…so that I, when I shall appear before His face may bear His likeness. Moreover, I declare that I endeavored to teach His Word undefiled and to expound Holy Scripture faithfully, according to the measure of grace which He has given me.”